Razer Naga Trinity review: Three gaming mice in one

It’s always been hard for me to recommend Razer’s Naga line, not because they’re bad mice but because they’re not the mice for me. They’re specialty hardware, not Swiss Army knives. The original Naga and its telephone-style numpad was designed for MMO players who need a lot of shortcut keys. The Naga Hex was a compromise of sorts, with half as many buttons in a much more intuitive, ring-shaped layout. But both always seemed overly complicated to me, especially for day-to-day use.

What if you didn’t have to choose, though? What if you could get the 12-button, six-button, and a standard two-button layout from the same mouse? Enter the Naga Trinity.

This review is part of our roundup of best gaming mice. Go there for details on competing products and how we tested them.

Third time’s the charm

Okay, here’s the downside: It’s still a Naga. I don’t mean to sound flip, but Razer’s MMO mouse has never been my favorite design. Short and wide, it doesn’t really feel comfortable in my hand whether I opt for a palm or a claw grip. It’s neither long enough for the former nor thin enough for the latter—at least in my experience.

Razer Naga Trinity IDG / Hayden Dingman

To each their own though, and if you like the Naga, nothing’s changed. The Naga Trinity is the exact same shape as the 2014 edition, with an overemphasized ring finger/pinky grip and the two DPI buttons behind the scroll wheel.

It also has Razer’s RGB lighting in all the usual spots—which is to say on the scroll wheel, on Razer’s logo, and on the left-hand side.

Which brings us to the most important feature of the Naga Trinity: that left-hand side.

As alluded by the name (and in my intro), the Naga Trinity is actually three different mice in one. The left side of the mouse is entirely interchangeable. You’d never know it simply by looking at it—it’s well-disguised. But the whole panel is held on by two small magnets, and peels off with a small amount of force. A few gold contacts let the mouse know which panel’s connected, and that’s it.

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